Tampering with the “Self” of the Masses

Post-WWII fallout, and a realization that beneath the surface we are all “irrational and violent drones” –  How this emerging Freudian view shaped American public policy (along with corporate strategy) regarding a neccessity to sheppard the masses into desired compliant, orderly and consumptive behavior,… and the birth of public relations.

[Ed. note: The above vid , is part 2 in a 4 part BBC series called “Century of the Self”. I haven’t watched the other parts.  Part 1 can be viewed here.]

My own toughts:

I could see where in the heady post-WWII era that top-down and unified schemes for managing the public psyche were hatched, and elites of the time rationalized this as for the good. All they had to do was point to the Nazis as examples of what we needed to help people avoid falling into. Of course it wasn’t so much about stamping out the evils of fear and desire but instead redirecting these emotions into something more useful. These grand schemes would have seemed to have broken down early, but the monster had been created, and the practice of managing fears and desires to institute control and predictable and profitable results had grown more sophisticated (and proven) than ever.

As disciples learn and perfect the tactics and techniques of tweaking the masses (to want what the elites want them to want) this begins to play out on increasingly diverse and competing fronts as many individuals and groups learn the game and seek to benefit. Now, there is a multitude of programs for getting into the heads of the masses. Despite what goes on at Davos, there appears to be no unified attempt to control what the masses think. Though there is much in common amongst many of the constant jabs of the thousand-prong mind attack.

Each individual mind-control practitioner, taught in the constantly perfected and statistically valid techniques of steering the emotions of irrational monkey brains, does so for short term personal gain, whereas wave after wave of eager next-generation opportunists pick up the ball and carry it forward again for their own gain. Political and corporate elites hit us hard with the most sophisticated mindfuck techniques in competition with each other. Cheap imitations also abound and some even work on the biggest suckers.

Our minds have been assaulted so well, by so many well-funded pros, that we may have in effect become entirely malleable super-irrational retard beings.

This too will pass one day and people can go back to being our normal irrational selves with a touch of practical insight and know-how regarding the more earthy necessities of day-to-day life. When grampa can do more than cry, but actually give you some good life-lesson advice about what’s really important.

Well thats me really going out on a limb with a gut reaction after watching 20 minutes of a four-hour documentary. Full of holes no doubt. Perhaps I’ll watch more of it to see how the story really goes. If I can just surpress my emotions long enough to sit through it.

This entry was posted by Bif.

133 thoughts on “Tampering with the “Self” of the Masses

  1. yeah, I have a comment, or a question: what asshole gave that kid a square front wheel for his trike? must be a bumpy ride like it’s gonna get for Nudge on her Batavus riding down unkept roads in the near future.

    you know Bif, mind control only works for so long on starving masses. then they get hungry.

  2. “you know Bif, mind control only works for so long on starving masses. then they get hungry.”

    No shit. However, you know doom, we still have a little time left for the engineering of consent, so don’t wag that finger at me. And don’t be in such a hurry. There will be plenty of time for all that end-game stuff later. So sit back, uncork a frosty, and enjoy the show.

    Until our captain of this vessel comes out of his self-imposed quarantine and returns to the bridge I will do my best to turn the wheel and re-arrange the decorations here on the bridge from time to time so that the crew might continue to believe this old scow is still on course in the service of Her Majesty. Not sure how long this foolery can last, wot with the scurvy and rickets.

  3. i think more along the lines that there’s no need to control the masses. for the most part, the masses control themselves. humans, and all other primates, except for maybe orangatangs, form groups based on a social hierachy. while there is a constant undercurrent of tension and a shuffeling of players within the structure, generally, except in times of various extremes; wars, famine, windfall abundance, the system is fairly stable. and even when one particular hierarchy falls apart, another just forms in it’s place.

    so, from the bling of the pharoes, to the celebrity shills of the elite dancing on the stage today, it’s all good.

    the big difference in my mind, between what’s going on now and what happened in the past is more a matter of scale than anything else. and the scale is really just a function of available energy and resources. they’ve, the pharoes, priests, billionares, or whatever you want to call them, have got the planet for all intents and purposes, 7 billion assholes strong, looking in the same direction. the basic message is something like: desire my bling or die.

  4. The Academy may well be doing more than Madison Avenue in this regard. We cherish our “educations” but I often wonder if it is just a place where they corral the chimps that are a little harder to control, and give them better mind fuck templates to build identities around and stay distracted with. Reward some of those chimps with cushier than average jobs as a bribe to keep the whole Ponzi scam going. I am painfully aware this semester that I am an operator on a Ponzi scam.

  5. “Well that’s me really going out on a limb with a gut reaction after watching 20 minutes of a four-hour documentary… If I can just surpress my emotions long enough to sit through it.”

    Thanks for this, Bif! It’s amazing seeing moving images from the past and how things have changed in some ways and not in others. Keep up the good work.

  6. Look! Over there! It’s a UFO – for reals. (just an offhand prediction of the next distraction level)

    Dunno dave, if it isn’t about control, TPTB sure spend an inordinate amount of time and treasure to know (or making us think they can know) where we are, what we are doing; deluging us with persistent 24x7x365 propaganda and subliminal happy-crap. And pre-crime thought/intent is all the DARPA rage.

    Somebody’s hand is gonna get forced soon enough.

  7. ‘”Self” of the Masses’ – a contradiction in terms? Is there a “Self” of the Elite?

    Yeah, I know, too linear, one-dimensional.

  8. “And pre-crime thought/intent is all the DARPA rage.”

    Remus, I have a DARPA site review of my project tomorrow. Maybe I’ll mention dave to them.

  9. “humans, and all other primates, except for maybe orangatangs, form groups based on a social hierachy.”

    what is it about those hippie orangatangs? are they on drugs? or a steady diet of over-ripe bananas?

  10. “And pre-crime thought/intent is all the DARPA rage.”

    Think constantly and about little other than carrots. It will serve you well.

  11. Who shortened my screen name! I will cut your balls off, you nutless freak. How dare you.

    Homey dredged some late 2007 photos of me off a hidden folder in his Handycam. Damn I was svelt and poster child-ready in those days.

    The way I see it, dave should have been a lawyer. That way he could make an even stronger case about how what each of us does is not our own doing and how we’s jus unwitting cogs facilitating the evil of others whose doings extend vastly beyond the potential even for our own perceptionating I might add.

    Like Jimbo says: If it wasn’t me who got on that 747, it would have been someone else.

  12. The thin veil of superiority is the reluctant stand-in for an honest measurable cloud of primate flatulence.

  13. Bif, I haven’t watched that video yet, but I’m guessing that just about anyone in a position of power, post-WWII, probably spent some non-insignificant amount of personal time considering and/or cobbling together a bewilderingly diverse array of distractions for monkeys — now living in the nuclear age — who, and this cannot be overstated, over time, time and time again, without exceptions of note, have consistently proven themselves unfit for self-governance.

  14. Dunno dave, if it isn’t about control, TPTB sure spend an inordinate amount of time and treasure to know (or making us think they can know) where we are, what we are doing; deluging us with persistent 24x7x365 propaganda and subliminal happy-crap. And pre-crime thought/intent is all the DARPA rage.

    yeah, i still see it as a matter of scale. my guess is that pharoes, popes, kings, wahtever, have devoted similar proportional levels of resourses towards provideing bling, and using truncheons when needed. some form of enforecement is always needed to maintain any particular hiearchal social order. but, when one order drops away, another forms. so, there always has been, and always will be an “elite” and a “rank and file” within human social units. it’s just the details and players that change.

  15. True that leaders/elites have been employing propaganda and steering popular sentiment/emotions for years and probably since the beginning of time when humans organized into large hierarchical groups. But this had always been for political ends, including consolidation of power and control, persecution, war mongering, and the like. Same could be said for long-standing efforts by the Church regarding mass-scale mind control and manipulation. But right after WWII, and for the first time (broadly and at scale), these methods of cultivating and exploiting the irrational subconscious emotions of the masses were deliberately applied in getting the masses to buy things they didn’t need. Indeed, the act of buying something you don’t need, and maybe even borrowing the money to do it, requires a completely irrational mindset involving a strong emotional impetus, including a sense of urgency. It turns out that instilling this response in the masses isn’t hard if you know what you are doing.

    For the first time in the U.S., elites were seducing common proles with the promise of luxury. Until then, luxury was seen as the sole domain of elites.

    Dave I agree that the abundance of energy and other material resources available to the U.S. during post WWII, and the means to achieve scaling up of everything, made some form of what happened inevitable.

    Bunn, I watched some of Part 1 yesterday, and it addressed how the more Sigmund Freud explored the depths of innate/subconscious human tendencies the more he became convinced that humans are completely incapable of self-governance and democracy, because we are hopelessly irrational and behave horribly in groups. He deduced that this is so much of who we are as a species it cannot be overcome. This depressed him so much he went into seclusion.

    Ironically, Freud’s own beloved nephew, Edward Bernays, took his work and used it to exploit the masses in rather cruel ways, and was wildly successful. Until then Freud was largely unknown outside the university. The first use of his work on mass scale was to get women to smoke cigarettes. Freudian psychologists were brought in to develop an approach for removing the taboo against women smoking. The scheme worked beautifully, an entire gender was punked, and it unleashed the other half of the market like a tidal wave. Profits sored. It became “text book” for what followed.

    Bernays is now considered to be the founder and god of modern public relations. Karl Rove is no doubt a student of the Bernays school.

  16. “Karl Rove is no doubt a student of the Bernays school.”

    No doubt the high priest or dean, perhaps president of that school.

    All this talk of mass manipulation and Freudian psychological schemes is making me nervous. Honey, can I borrow one of your cigarettes?

  17. Doomy, you’ve come a long way, baby.

    “He deduced that this is so much of who we are as a species it cannot be overcome. This depressed him so much he went into seclusion.”

    If it’s good enough for Sigmund Freud and JR, it’s good enough for me.

    Carl Rove’s clout has run out. What a complete fraud. He’s even more contemptible than a straight-up Marxist like Chavez. In two years, WSJ will finally answer his calls with “Carl who?”

  18. well, sure bif, only one word is needed to answer all your concerns, in my mind anyway, industrialism.

    one of things that the industrial elite figured out awful quick was that it don’t do you any good to have a factory spitting out million widgets a day, if you don’t have enough people to buy them. so, twist a few knobs flip a couple switches, burn up a couple billion barrels of oil, and of course people are gonna worship buicks instead of sun gods and other such shit(this all goes back to why i intentionally made a fetish of a polisshed and well oil asshole. but that’s a whole nuther story.)

    also, and this is fucking huge, within originateing cultures(outsiders are a differnet story) anyway, industrialism delivered the fucking goods. for just about the first time in human history (recorded history) everybody, at least everybody who followed the dictates of industrialism(one of the reasons that those who missed out are cast as individual failures and such. but this is no differnt than cultures who often cast those having a tragedy of some sort outside the norm as sinners and such. circumstances change, but people don’t.) had enough to eat and a warm dry place to sleep. so why wouldn’t most people be industrialists? fuck, even dumbshits like ee, who like to point thier silly little waggy fingers at those who keep the system going (not that we don’t all play our parts, no matter how small), to the bitter end, like having a full belly and a warm place to sleep at night.

  19. yeah, tobbacco, corn, oil, cars… whatever; the upslope of industry was all about using up the surplus, creating demand. the downslope, which maybe more of a cliff in spots, is all about demand destruction.

  20. ….because, just because… they were Jung und Anna Freud.

    yeah, get it. i still don’t think it’s funny, but i get it.

  21. oh yeah, i got hitch22 at the library yesterday. i fell aspleep about half way through the first page. i’ll try again later.

  22. people of every age, every culture, want to think that they’re special, even all these interchangeable industrial products that you see around you, as strange as that may be. so they tell stories about how special they are, even how special they are in the ways that they’re controled. but, sad to say, i guess, there’s nothing all that special going on here.

  23. Come on dave, you know it’s different this time.

    well, yes there is absolutely the matter of scale. never before have all the fucking monkeys on earth shared the same idee fixe. the idee that the gods of industry can rain down the manna of heaven on each and every living and breathing asshole out there, if only you beleve. you must have faith, work hard. type harder and faster. more lawsuites is what we need. no faster fucking trains. look, the fucking chinks are on the moon. goddammit, where is hk when we need him. his vision is clear.

    of course there’s also the ipod and genetically engineered chickens, we got that shit goin’ on for us.

  24. Like getting chased around by a grizzly bear.

    no, this shit is more funny than scary. i shit my pants just getting within 100 feet of a grizzly bear.

  25. Come on dave, you know it’s different this time.

    no, really. look at the cathedralls of europe. those medeville popes and kings and shit had mind control down to a science that bill gates and all of the bildeburgs put together could only fucking dream of, and jerk off to, also.

  26. kill the fucking nonbelievers, same as it ever was. but yes, the scale of it changes everything.

  27. or maybe you’re worried about the use of technology to either: a) turn non believers into believers, or B) use of technology to idrntify and then kill off nonbelievers? well, in both cases, which i don’t buy into either senerio for lots of reasons, problem solved. all you’re left with is believers, the perfect fucking world. ee would love it there.

  28. but serious business, if i could meet leowenhook, the guy who invented the microscope, i’d kiss his ass. cause that lead to the germ therory, which lead to antibiotics. so, when i used to fuck a lot of whores without a condom, and get gonhorea and stuff, i could get cured. so that’s good. of course, iguess i’d have to find the guy who ground lenses, and then find the guy who first made glass, and then find the guy who fist figured out that blowing air into a fire and containing the flame could increase temperature. but then there’s the fucking monkey who first found a roasted pig after a forest fire and said, goddamit but fucking roasted pig is good as shit….

  29. and how come those german assholes still think eating raw pork is just fine? are they really so backwards not to get the message, after all these years, that some guy over in france found a roasted one after a fire there and hey, it tastes pretty iffn good that way?

    damn backwards krauts. french food rulz.

    and dave, i wonder if any of those smarter chinks will get to the moon, look around and realize, hey, this place really sucks! no water (well, there’s some it turns out, in the permafrost), no trees, no grass. nice views of earth and all, but yas gotta wear a space suit all the time outdoors and diaper rash in those outfits is a real possibility.

  30. dave, open up that library book and find this chapter.

    http://www.slate.com/id/2255781/entry/2255782/

    I can appreciate what I think is an attempt at honesty by CH, yet I also have to agree with Dolan’s ripping of Hitchens to the extent that the latter may actually have been inappropriately attempting to assert a kindredness of spirit with the departed HST. At least HST had the decency to give a nod to Nixon (well, when compared to Bush, anyway). I have more sympathy for Hitchens than anything, but this excerpt about his father — while at times presented with great panache — is disturbingly similar to the disloyal and condescending HST forward, which was correctly identified as such by Dolan. (Even a kook like Dolan is right sometimes.)

    It would seem to me a great shame if Hitchens’ stylish yet seemingly detached accounting of the events of his early life is scarcely further developed that what we see here — so many opportunities for further exploration are left unfinished. Then again, who cares; good writing is good writing. As Bif noted, and as I now paraphrase, the content of the message is often, and in many circumstances, far less important than the delivery vehicle.

  31. krauts eat raw pork? there’s a joke in there someplace.

    but chinks on the fucking moon, that’s funny all by itself.

  32. …the content of the message is often, and in many circumstances, far less important than the delivery vehicle.

    i’m tempted to say that the content is always less important than the form. jaming the content into a palitable, and preferably digestable, form is the trick, i think.

  33. it’s like hitchens for me; i take bite, chew it for a little, but something about the texture or something makes me spit it out before i swallow, every time.

  34. see, now i almost regret my last post. i read that ch excerpt and kinda liked it. it reminded me of my relationship, more or less, with my own father. my father’s most endearing words to me, that i can recollect anyway, were some like: “davey, don’t never worry about nothin’ that any of these dumbshits have to say to you. you an’ me won’t never amount to moren’ a pinch of shit no matter how hard we might try.” words to live by, i’d say.

  35. Topic:
    Christopher Hitchens
    Friday, May 18, 2001 15:41 ET
    Wanted: If Henry Kissinger isn’t guilty of war crimes, no one is. A Vietnam War whistleblower on Christopher Hitchens’ case against the former secretary of state.

    By Fred Branfman “It is the lack of (Albert Speer’s) psychological and spiritual ballast and the ease with which he handles the terrifying technical and organizational machinery of our age which make this slight type go extremely far nowadays. This is their age; the Hitlers and Himmlers we may get rid of, but the Speers, whatever happens to this particular special man, will long be with us.”
    — London Observer, April 9, 1944

    “The attack of bombardment, by whatever means, of towns, villages, dwellings, or buildings which are undefended is prohibited.”
    — Article 25, The Hague Convention, 1907

    Henry Kissinger was a lightning rod for Vietnam War opponents from 1969 to 1975, when he served as national security advisor and secretary of state to Presidents Nixon and Ford. A quarter century after Kissinger left public service, the United States is still picking at the scars of Vietnam and grappling with the global resentments sparked by his realpolitik policies. And yet, despite a whiff of ignominy that still clings to him, Kissinger has grown jowly and prosperous off his connections and consulting services, and is feted in the most exclusive salons of Manhattan and Washington. His guttural pronouncements can be heard whenever there’s a global crisis that needs explanation.

    But some of us will never forget the Kissinger of the 1970s.

    Several times a month, as I shave, I find myself looking deeply into my eyes — and remembering theirs. It took a lot to create that haunted and broken look in the eyes of the peasants who had fled the Plain of Jars in northern Laos. I interviewed hundreds of these refugees from the illegal Nixon-Kissinger air war while working as a journalist and interpreter for TV reporters like Ted Koppel and Bernard Kalb between September 1969 and February 1971. I dispatched tapes of these interviews and photos to congressional committees in Washington and later appeared before a hearing chaired by Sen. Ted Kennedy. But while my efforts helped generate a flurry of attention for the victims of the illegal Laos air war — the most brutal and sustained bombing campaign against a civilian population in history — no one from the Nixon administration was ever brought to justice as a result.

    They had names, these people: Thao, Bounphet, Khamphong, Loung. They had treasured wives and husbands, children and grandparents, buffaloes and homes, rice fields and temples. And they had dreams — and as much right to these dreams as did any of the U.S. leaders who obliterated them.

    It was a wrenching experience to hear these kind, decent human beings describe the extermination of revered grandmothers, burned alive by napalm before their eyes, to hear them weep as they remembered seeing a beloved 3-year-old daughter torn apart by anti-personnel bombs. Many of the children who survived carried the marks of the U.S. air war, burned flesh, missing limbs.

    These people had voices, too, although they were rarely heard back in the United States. I collected their stories in a book called “Voices From the Plain of Jars.” In it, one 33-year-old woman recalled, “We lived in holes to protect our lives. There were bombs of many kinds. I saw my cousin die in the field of death. My heart was most disturbed and my voice called out loudly. (The airplanes came) until there were no houses at all. And the cows and buffalo were finished. Until everything was leveled and you could see only the red, red ground.”

    The Nixon-Kissinger holocaust from above continued to afflict the peasant populations of Southeast Asia until the end of the war. Although these two remorseless executioners were finally forced by the growing antiwar fervor at home to withdraw U.S. ground troops, they vastly expanded their bombing operations across Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. Their goal was not, as they claimed, to protect the American troop withdrawal. The North Vietnamese would have happily escorted U.S. troops out of the country. Rather, Nixon and Kissinger used the bombing to prop up local regimes and avoid being seen as responsible for “losing” Indochina.

    It is important to separate the way the air war was conducted from the politics on the ground. Even if one believes U.S. support for local Indochinese regimes was warranted, this in no way justified the indiscriminate U.S. bombing that decimated hundreds of villages in violation of the most basic laws of humanity and international justice. Nor is it true, as Kissinger claims, that his bombing was supported by Congress. This supremely cunning man orchestrated an extraordinary coverup of the extent of civilian casualties. Had the full human consequences of the air war been brought before the American people, it’s likely that support for U.S. bombing would have quickly evaporated.

    Nearly 4 million tons of bombs were dropped on the people of Southeast Asia while Kissinger orchestrated the war, over 1 million tons more than was dropped during the presidency of Lyndon Johnson and twice the tonnage dropped on all of Europe and the entire Pacific theater in World War II. More than 1 million Indochinese perished and 10 million were wounded and made homeless.

    Kissinger executed this massive aerial assault without any serious regard for the civilians below, as I discovered in an investigation of the bombing of Cambodia in the spring of 1973. On a research mission for Washington’s Indochina Resource Center, I spent a day flying over a Khmer Rouge-controlled area that the U.S. Embassy estimated was inhabited by 2 million Cambodians without seeing a single sign of life. I had hitched a ride with an old acquaintance from Laos who was piloting a plane on contract for the CIA, dropping supplies to outposts of pro-U.S. Cambodian troops. He told me the people were hiding from the American bombing — particularly the B-52s, which indiscriminately obliterated areas the size of football fields from 30,000 feet — and that there was little if any evidence on the ground of legitimate military targets.

    I used the pilot’s radio the next day to listen in on raids, and discovered that U.S. pilots bombing Cambodia neither knew, nor checked with anyone to discover, if there were civilians in the area. Later I was informed by the U.S. Air Force “bombing officer” at 7th Air Force Headquarters in Nakhorn Phanom, Thailand, who was officially charged with making sure that no civilian targets were bombed, that in reality he only certified that no CIA teams were in areas under bombardment. He said he had no idea if civilians were present.

    This wanton bombing of civilian populations was a direct violation of international law. And it is this wholesale slaughter of noncombatants that Christopher Hitchens cites in making his strongest case for the prosecution of Henry Kissinger as a war criminal in his provocative new book, “The Trial of Henry Kissinger.” (Hitchens interviewed me for the book, distilling my reports into a two-page discussion of the bombing of Laos.)

    Hitchens’ book originated as a two-part essay in Harper’s magazine in February and March 2001. The Harper’s essay stirred no investigative interest in official Washington or corporate media circles, as did the recent Bob Kerrey revelations. But Hitchens did succeed in provoking a lively reassessment of Kissinger’s record on the Internet and in campus forums. His book deserves much wider attention. If former Sen. Bob Kerrey’s actions as a young Navy commando in Vietnam momentarily pricked the national conscience, Kissinger’s Southeast Asia policies should haunt us to our graves if we do not come to terms with them.

    If killing hundreds of thousands of innocent peasants by dropping million of tons of bombs on undefended civilian targets is not a war crime, then there are no war crimes. If Kissinger is not responsible for these crimes, then there are no war criminals.

    Hitchens does not confine his case against Kissinger to the bombing of Indochina. He also focuses on the dark arts of Kissinger diplomacy, the aiding and abetting of murderous U.S. client states, such as the Pakistani regime whose violent repression of Bangladesh in 1974 resulted in the deaths of between 500,000 and 3 million people, the blood-soaked junta led by Augusto Pinochet in Chile and the Indonesian generals who killed 200,000 civilians in East Timor.

    There is no question that Kissinger’s support for such savage regimes will stain his name for many years to come. But it would be more difficult to indict Kissinger as a war criminal for these actions — since other powers ordered the actual killing — than for his actions in Indochina. There he was a prime architect of the massive bombing of undefended civilian targets. And international conventions endorsed by the U.S., such as the 1907 Hague convention quoted above, unambiguously forbid such bombing.

    Not surprisingly, Kissinger shares few of Hitchens’ concerns in his new book, “Does America Need a Foreign Policy?” which largely ignores Vietnam, Indonesia, Chile and many other Cold War battlegrounds to which he once devoted so much time. But Kissinger and Hitchens do share an interest in one subject: the Pinochet case, that is, the extent to which jurists in one nation have international jurisdiction over officials who have committed human rights violations in another. Writing of Spain’s indictment of the former Chilean dictator on torture and murder charges, and his subsequent detainment in England, Hitchens notes that “Kissinger [has grasped] what so many other people did not: that if the Pinochet precedent became established, then he himself was in some danger.”

    Indeed Kissinger does seem worried when he addresses the subject in his book: “If the Pinochet case becomes a precedent, magistrates anywhere will be in a position to put forward an extradition request without warning to the accused and regardless of the policies that the accused’s country might already have in place for dealing with these charges.”

    Fortunately for Kissinger, in his case, “the accused’s country” has no such policies for dealing with the mass murder of civilians in Indochina. Not only are there no official means for dealing with Hitchens’ charges against him, but he is lionized by the highest sectors of American society. As Hitchens notes, Kissinger is paid between $25,000 and $30,000 a speech and has grown wealthy by offering advice to Fortune 500 companies and catering to foreign clients like the Chinese dictatorship. His opinions are sought by Newsweek and the Washington Post; his new book is a Book of the Month Club selection. Kissinger’s status tells us less about himself than it does about our society as it begins the 21st century.

    Only a nation in deep spiritual and psychological disarray could honor a man with as much blood on his hands as Henry Kissinger. An entire generation was plunged into a moral abyss during the Vietnam War from which it has yet to emerge. This moral confusion was on stark display during the recent public agony over Bob Kerrey’s wartime actions. Under what circumstances, if any, is it permissible to kill civilians? Should America ever engage in wars where military enemies and civilians cannot be separated? The fact that we are still struggling with these questions decades after we fled Vietnam shows how deeply unresolved they still are.

    It is not necessary, however desirable, to say we were wrong in intervening in Indochina, or even to admit that we were responsible for the vast majority of the war’s casualties. But we refuse at our peril to at least take responsibility for the millions of casualties we certifiably did cause, and seek to make amends to the relatives of those we killed. The Germans did so after World War II, not so much for the Jews as for themselves. Our failure to do so harms our society no less than that of the Indochinese.

    Kissinger’s new book highlights the central problem facing America today: the rise of a skilled but unfeeling class that has ascended to the heights of power as the new century begins. Kissinger’s stance is that of the technocrat, above party and ideology, unselfishly pursuing the national interest. “On the left, many act as if America has the appropriate democratic solution for every society regardless of cultural and historical differences,” he writes. “On the right, some believe … that the solution to the world’s ills is American hegemony. Either interpretation makes it difficult to elaborate a long-range approach to a world in transition.”

    But what exactly is the nonideological “long-range approach” we need? Kissinger never really says. His book is essentially a foreign policy travelogue, as he proceeds region by region around the world describing a variety of short-term issues — supporting missile defense here, sanctions against Saddam Hussein there — and making countless observations of stupefying banality. Even more striking than the vacuity of what he does say, however, is what he does not. America’s top foreign policy imperative for the coming century is clearly to lead an international effort to save a biosphere now seriously threatened by global warming and other environmental ills. Kissinger gives the tersest of nods to this monumental global challenge, bundling it together with a hodgepodge of “New Age issues: proliferation, environmental, cultural and scholarly exchange, among many others.”

    It is almost banal to note Kissinger’s banality. But his unique mixture of emptiness and celebrity, power and amorality, mystique and lack of principles, has made him one of the quintessential figures of the post-World War II era — fulfilling the prediction made by the London Observer 57 years ago.

    In the past we had most to fear from charismatic tyrants. Today it is the technocrats, the “slight types” who efficiently run our government and dominate our age. It is the Dick Cheneys, who manage our withdrawal from the Kyoto treaty on global warming and cut spending on conservation; the Donald Rumsfelds, who lead the charge for missile defense and space war and disturb the world’s nuclear equilibrium.

    With his unparalleled talent for bureaucratic intrigue and media manipulation, Henry Kissinger was among the first of these types to attain power in the post-war world.

    He will not be the last.

  36. so why is it that Baba Wawa was/is so in love with Henry? could it be a journalistic lapse because poor Baba was/is in love with his heavy Hungarian (?) accent? animal magnetism? doesn’t she/didn’t she know she’s flirting with a war criminal?

  37. Why all the hand-wringing over Henry the K? Vietnam is/was just a fucking hobby horse.

    Sure seems like a lot of misplaced/disingenuous moral outrage, including Hitchens.

    “unique mixture of emptiness and celebrity, power and amorality, mystique and lack of principles”

    Yawn. Instead of whining about these pricks, put’em out of our misery and move on.

  38. ee, it’s like hk boned your little sister and now you’re all pissed off and jealous and shit: “that asshole, dosen’t he know that i give way better head than that stupid little bitch. goddamitallanyway, sister rosemary was right, dicks are just nasty. stupid little cunt can have all the hk dick she can get. idon’t care. goddam her, and him. but oh how i wish he would pick me, just once.”

  39. It is almost banal to note Kissinger’s banality.

    haha, at least this retard can start smelling his own banality. there’s nothing more banal than the chomskyish( i’m fucking proud of that one) pandering to pseudo intelligensia of the politically enlightened, who happen to be absolutley fucking clueless to the human necessity behind all political action.

  40. “Yawn. Instead of whining about these pricks, put’em out of our misery and move on.”

    Uncle Remus is right (as usual). We have moron important things to worry about now, like Nudge and her Batavus getting pancaked by a semi.

  41. Doom. Nudge likes riding her bike, it makes her happy. Happiness is a good thing. Why the constant disapproval?

  42. a, it’s dangerous, b, she seems to have lost about 50% of her IQ since taking up the sport. i understand the former, but cannot fathom why the latter should be true. indorphins?

    bikes will be/could be (see thought added below) great when cars go the way of the buffalo. until then, even on lightly travelled country roads in Massachusetts, it’s playing with fire, just like with the little Honda Insight, only worse.

    ironically, once cars go away, i suspect most bikes may go with them. they are personal transport devices, like cars and horses and buggies, and are expensive and will eventually become difficult to maintain once JIT goes away. i’m with dave on this.

  43. Speaking of mind control and advertising…

    A World War II Naval Reserve veteran, Haldeman attended the University of Redlands, the University of Southern California and graduated from the University of California, Los Angeles in 1948, where he was a member of Beta Theta Pi fraternity. At UCLA, he met John Ehrlichman, who would become a close friend and colleague in the Nixon administration. After graduation, he spent 20 years working for the J. Walter Thompson advertising agency in both Los Angeles and New York City; other employees of this firm during this period included Ronald Ziegler, who went on to serve as White House Press Secretary in the Nixon administration.

  44. yeah, if nudge likes to ride her bike, she should ride her bike. why she bought some kind of euro-city bike for cranking up and down ma roads is beyond me. but a lot of things are beyond me. i think she got bling in her eye from all those eurotrash girls styling around copenhagen and shit.

    doom, i’ve spend some part of essentially everyday riding around on a bike. probably the only time i actually kind of refuse to ride is right after a snow storm. the snow gets piled onto the shoulder and sides of the road. any room use once had to stay out of the traffic is gone.

    i do think that bicycle activists, if that’s the right term, are awfull fucking silly. you know, those that insist on taking the lane, harass the cops about enforcing traffic rules, try to force commuters into sharing thier space on crowed trains with thier bikes, etc. they just piss people off and make it worse for all of us who are just out there either enjoying the day, or just trying to get around on cheap mode of transport, etc.

    and yes, as i’ve said many times, bikes are just as much a product of industry as cars.

  45. what’s that old joke? pussy is the one thing on earth that you can’t wear out no matter how much you use it? something along those lines.

  46. so, ee, you gonna go to a ceremony to mark the 70’th birthday of this fucking corporate shill? anticorporate propoganda used to be a big money maker back in the ’70’s you know. mark david chapman saw through the lies. or maybe he was just kinda looney, hard to say… i think he had a stated reason, something he could articulate, for why he killed lennon; but i can’t remember what it was. do you?

  47. there’s always been this strange line of reasoning running through the anticorporate ranks, that it’s somehow ok to use, and pay for, corporate outlets to protest the corporate/idustrial system(not that they have a choice, of course). i can’t help but think of medevil aristocrats, and, better yet, the peasants, who would pay into the monastic/agraian sytem for sins that were created by the church. some things never change, i guess.

  48. of course the talented and hard working rise to the top, just ask saint benedict(famously founding the benedictine order, just so you ignorant fucks out here know), and john fucking lennon.

  49. 2 minutes and 46 seconds. just time enough for me to get a finger stuck into my asshole and finish jerking off. the beatles truly were musical geniuses(sp?).

  50. Bif: “Happiness is a good thing. Why the constant disapproval?”

    Doom: “a, it’s dangerous, b, she seems to have lost about 50% of her IQ since taking up the sport. i understand the former, but cannot fathom why the latter should be true. Indorphins?”

    Doom, all that happened is that I went from bitching about peak FF energy to doing something useful about transportation arrangements for after the peak. It feels rather good to be exercising more than just my keyboarding muscles and sense of outrage. To be sure, this change has generated fewer blog posts, much less ranting, and a higher percentage of posts having to do with bicycles, but ~ oh well!

    While peak oil and peak-other-things are going to be problems indeed, the reality is that most of us here in the UPL will experience it as various forms of poverty. Our real wages will be worth less and our real expenses will be higher.

    Actually I feel substantially less safe in the Honda. Jackazz BFT’ers out here still tailgate mercilessly. When I’m on the bike it’s a little different, people have a real fear of being sued into oblivion. Probably some Mass cycling org has got genuine flesh-eating lawyers on staff too.

    Err, if you wait until cars are disappearing and everyone else is suddenly wanting to get bicycles too, you’ll be late to the party and stuck in a very, very long line with many others. Remember that line of cars trying to get out of NOLA? Like that but a couple thousand times longer.

    Thanks Bif :)

  51. “krauts eat raw pork? there’s a joke in there someplace.”

    they call it mett (yes, it’s pronounced like your hapless favorite baseball team–now there’s a joke). it’s spiced a bit and usually served on toast. i’ve eaten it in german bakeries for breakfast, with strong coffee and sweets. sometimes they put finely chopped onions on top.

    once after finishing some for breakfast in a Kiel bakery, i told my german friend Hans, “wow, that was great. i feel strong. let’s go kill some french!”

    http://www.traveljournals.net/pictures/55535.html

  52. Mark David Chapman, IIRC, shot and killed John Lennon because he was influenced by the movie Taxi Driver, and was in love with the child star Jodie Foster, whom was Robert De Niro’s proto-whore love interest for which De Niro’s character attempted to kill a guy running for president, or something to that effect, or because he had been brushed off by a fellow campaign worker played by Cybill Sheperd.

    Talk about psychological transfer, MDC targets Lennon, not a political leader, to impress Foster, who was just playing a role in a movie, and who turns out to actually prefer the company of females more than men, to boot, not that MDC ever had a chance in Hell of impressing Ms. Jodie, certainly not with a celebrity murder. Overall result: some asshole prematurely silences one of our greatest contemporary singer/songwriters and influential peace activist.

  53. Um-m-m-m, Doom… it was John Hinckley that had the Taxi Driver/Jodie Foster obsession, and he DID try to assassinate Ronnie Raygun…

  54. Overall result: some asshole prematurely silences one of our greatest contemporary singer/songwriters and influential peace activist.

    hmmm, yeah, if you say so. looks more like gloming on to some cheap publicity to me. it’s great for everybody. a media gets to sell media, an artist gets to sell art, and monkeys get to jabber about other, cause they play well to the media, monkeys. and get this, it’s even better, hk, or some interchageable cog, gets to keep bombing cambodia, or whoever else might need to be bombed at the moment. winwinwinwin.

  55. it’s just like frank zappa once said: “if you look behind the curtain, all you’re gonna see is a brick wall”; or something like that.

    but then he pandered to his base by getting on stage in with the likes of pat robertson, dee snyder and the u.s. congress. it was very disheartning to me as young man. but as i’ve matured, i’ve come to better understand that he had no choice in the matter.

  56. the thing that fz missed, i think, is that brick walls have patterns and textures all there own.

  57. most people hate looking at brick walls, not that i blame them, so they go back to dancing around in front of the curtain. they have no choice in the matter, of course.

  58. so, if hinkley shot regan for jodie foster, wich seems about as good a reason as any to me, why did chapman shoot lennon?

  59. i think that monkeys like jabbering about other monkeys bettern’ sex even. as soon as thier bellies are full, they get to jabbering; which of course is largly designed to lead to sex. then they get hungry again.

    ee, if you don’t like predictabilty, then you shouldn’t be a monkey. but you have on choice in the matter, i guess. just sayin’.

  60. Note of trivia: today, on my way to Kailua town for a doctor’s appointment (driving solo in my big SUV–my bad again) I passed Castle Memorial Hospital, site of prior admittance and later gainful occupation for one John Hinckley, err, I mean Mark David Chapman.

    It turns out he was obsessed by JD Salinger’s “The Catcher in the Rye”. At least the nut job has literary taste.

    Also, today’s the 70th birthday of John Lennon, had not MDC ended his life at 40.

    http://www.time.com/time/audioslide/0,32187,2024447,00.html?hpt=C1

  61. How awful Barbara Walters would sit down with Chapman and give him a microphone. He doesn’t deserve a forum for explaining anything. He murdered Lennon to become famous and she gratifies his motive. What an asshole accomplice media whore she is.

  62. Baba Wawa is literally a media whore. she does it for the money, and for the GE stock holders.

  63. mdc needs to get to the gym or something. in 1992 he looked pretty well fed and rested, just out of shape. dosen’t, or didn’t, that was a long time ago, look like he gets his ass kicked much or nothing. gues the other inmates weren’t beatles fans.

    anyway, since he’s famous now, he might have a shot with jodie foster. these fucking media whores are all the same.

  64. “anyway, since he’s famous now, he might have a shot with jodie foster. these fucking media whores are all the same.”

    err, dave, that was john hinckley that has a hard one for jodie foster, i think.

    mdc likes little kids, he likes to tackle them in the rye grass and “save” them from falling off a cliff. how much moron honorable is that?

  65. anyway, who the fuck gets life without parol for second degree murder? guess the lesson is to just not shoot some fucking corporate shill, i’d say.

  66. They’re just diluting the gene pool.

    hmm, so dosen’t that mean thet you should shoot corporate shills, but not get caught?

  67. just look at mdc, just fer instance. if he had his witts about himself, he could have shot jl, fucking ran away; and then maybe gone on to shoot ophra winfrey, before she got fat, rich and famous. just think of the possibilities; jodie foster would be sucking his dick at this very fucking moment. poor planning is all i got to say about it.

  68. The definition for pegging John Lennon as a corporate shill casts an extraordinarily broad net. For example, you could also say anyone taking advantage of internet resources right now supports corporate status quo. I guess you could also say that anyone who takes advantage of these corporate commerce platforms for promoting his/her own anti-establishmant views (how else do do it?) can be a minor pain in their ass, maybe. Work hard enough using their tools and you can still get yourself on a watch list, but the prospects that arrise from this for generating commerce are probably just as good. Where do you draw the line in getting your own views out to the world dave?

    Anyway. You gotta admit that the “more popular than Jesus” comment by him was was pretty freakin precious.

  69. “You gotta admit that the ‘more popular than Jesus’ comment by him was was pretty freakin precious.”

    Never did get the brouhaha over that. Then again, I never got into Lennon that much. A little too detached from reality – I am talking about when he was actually alive. He didn’t seem to deal with reality well. Liked a lot of his music though.

  70. Speaking of examples of botched corporate mind control, I remember the Bay City Rollers being introduced to the world as the next Beatles, by Howard Cosell of all people.

  71. Another failure to launch: The Dave Clarke Five.

    Hey, how much tanning and resting does JR need to get ready for his comeback???

  72. you know, when i found out that john antiestablishment, stop the war, peace-love-out lennon was the owner of a large upstate ny dairy farm, well, it put the nut in my ear, so to speak, that all was not what it seemed to be in just imagine all the people land.

    dave, you’re an iffn genius to point that guy out as corporate shill.

  73. old rich widowed hags interviewed by larry king about the good ole daz. so it’s come down to this. beatles rise and fall as metaphor for the collapse of industrial civilization. brilliant, ee.

  74. Where do you draw the line in getting your own views out to the world dave?

    well, i sure don’t know. i guess i would have to say something like, certain inviduals play larger, even larger than life, roles within the industrial spectacle, than most others, and they can’t help but profit from it. to me, jl got swept up into a role, no differently than say hk or bill gates or bill clinton. but, due to the human propensity to form hierarchy, such individuals get fixated on, often either as villians, or heros, or both at the same time, depending on who you talk to. so, jl played to his audience, and hk played to his. just like all of us play to an audience. mine is awful fucking small.

    shit, the argument has often been made that the peace protestors lengthened the vietnam war, which was “the” issue of the time, by creating sympathy for the enemy and such. it’s also been argued that hk’s bombing of cambodia was the action that finally brought the vietcong to the bargaining table.

    anyway, i guess, that my bottum line is something like: jl used the industrial spectacle to benefit himself just like the rest of us. but, he got a lot more out of it than me; so that makes him a shill.

  75. i mean fuck, if jl was serious about peace and shit, he had enough fame and money to do what, if he wanted to? there are dozens of ways he could have thrown a wrench into the works. raise a small “army” of his own and fly to n vietnam? i don’t know. but to lay in bed in toronto as an example of passivity for all, and plaster it all over the world? who likes a passive and safe celebrity bettern’ the “corporation”? he laid down and collected his money, just like every smart celebrity does, not that i blame him even one bit. i woulda done the same. and if i was hk, i woulda done the same as him too.

  76. so ee, i’d be kind of interested in your views on that larry king bit. whay post it.

    me? honestly, i couldn’t stomach it. i maybe woulda been better if chris hitchens was narrarting somehow or another: “yes, yes, i once saw john and george from across the way as i was gazing, contamplatively, from my attic window in oxford. from this vantage, i see them immediately for thier marginal muscial talents and poor taste in women. i called out to them to partake in a dram of the water of life, scotch, for my ignornant fan base, but they ignored me. cheeky bastards…”

  77. That was a rather good impersonation of Hitchens. And borrowing a phrase from Hitch-22 as well. Nice flourish.

    Man, you guys don’t cut these celebs any slack.

    Dave. I think I see better where you’re going on the Lennon thing, but the “corporate shill” words aren’t doing it for me. Conflict of interest? Hypocrisy maybe? I could see that. But to be a shill you do need to be deliberately pushing someone else’s agenda. Do you think he was? I don’t. He had his own thing going and he set himself up to benefit from it. Rock and roll has always been show business, and show business is just business.

    One thing about Garcia and Weir is they didn’t leave any of this shit to chance. When asked about the Grateful Dead serving as some kind of peace love or counterculture movement they responded by saying no, the Dead was a business and they were businessmen. This was quite honest, and didn’t seem to stand in the way of fans taking away what they wanted from the music. They also lived long enough to admit it.

    Whether Lennon was up front about the business or not, it wouldn’t have made any difference. It was the dawn of the 80s when he died, Reagan had just been elected, and the Woodstock generation wanted to nuke Iran. I stayed away from all that, instead dyeing my hair back to its natural color, consigning my punk jacket, and signing up for classes in finance (having never disclosed that this had been the plan all along. ssshhh. heh heh.)

  78. “Rock and roll has always been show business, and show business is just business.”

    Kinda brings you right back to where you started with this thread, eh Bif?

    The “healing art” of Freud being turned upside down and used to exploit the selfsame folks he thought he wanted to help.

    http://www.alice-miller.com/interviews_en.php

  79. Dave. I think I see better where you’re going on the Lennon thing, but the “corporate shill” words aren’t doing it for me. Conflict of interest? Hypocrisy maybe? I could see that. But to be a shill you do need to be deliberately pushing someone else’s agenda. Do you think he was? I don’t. He had his own thing going and he set himself up to benefit from it. Rock and roll has always been show business, and show business is just business.

    delibirately pushing someone else’s agenda? ya got me there, i don’t know exactly.

    was he delibirately pushing an an agenda favorable to the corporate elite at the time; yes, there’s no doubt in my mind about that. “they” couldn’t be happier than to have protest channeled into activities like sitting in bed, and selling records and posters and shit as a bonus. was that jl’s intention? probably not; at least not in the same way that a scientist might work intentionly at discrediting negative data on cigarette use. but, he did work at spreading the lie that peace through passivity within a system based solely on violence is possible, and got paid for it.

    it’s kinda like, is a priest a shill for god, and is god(at least within a religious understanding) anything other than a concept that can never be realized? does any of this mean that a priest dosen’t belive in his own message? does the tobacco company scientist believe his message? do cigarettes, the idea of god, and the idea of peace on earth make various people happy, docile and satisfied and sell various products?

    One thing about Garcia and Weir is they didn’t leave any of this shit to chance. When asked about the Grateful Dead serving as some kind of peace love or counterculture movement they responded by saying no, the Dead was a business and they were businessmen. This was quite honest, and didn’t seem to stand in the way of fans taking away what they wanted from the music. They also lived long enough to admit it.

    yeah, i think garcia made it a policy to not talk on stage so that his words wouldn’t get turned into something they weren’t.

    Whether Lennon was up front about the business or not, it wouldn’t have made any difference. It was the dawn of the 80s when he died, Reagan had just been elected, and the Woodstock generation wanted to nuke Iran. I stayed away from all that, instead dyeing my hair back to its natural color, consigning my punk jacket, and signing up for classes in finance (having never disclosed that this had been the plan all along. ssshhh. heh heh.)

    and ronald reagan wasn’t a shill? he sold the story that america could be great again, possibly forever. at least he didn’t lie about doing it peacefully. so that pissed off some of the dummies. he probably beleieved every word he said; that’s the difference between a shill and a great shill.

  80. Well I don’t know about priests as shills because they are pretty upfront about who they work for and what they are trying to do. Tobacco scientists are sneaky and disingenuos about it so I would say they are shills for sure. Reagan was a shill but most politicians are (as in they are doing someone else’s bidding but insisting they aren’t).

    EE, ironically Freud eventually profitted financially from others who were mis-using his work (to exploit rather than help people), which allowed him to get a place in the country and live comfortably. I wonder what deep subconscious emotion let him cash the checks?

  81. “I wonder what deep subconscious emotion let him cash the checks?”

    Probably the same thing that led him to subvert his initial suppositions:

    “Freud realized and published in 1896 that neurosis is the result of child-mistreatment (To him it was above all the sexual abuse). As a result, he was confronted with the hatred and rejection of all of his colleagues and could not bear this loneliness. So he invented a theory of the infantile sexuality and the Oedipus complex that protects the parents and blames the child.”

  82. “Freud realized and published in 1896 that neurosis is the result of child-mistreatment (To him it was above all the sexual abuse). As a result, he was confronted with the hatred and rejection of all of his colleagues and could not bear this loneliness. So he invented a theory of the infantile sexuality and the Oedipus complex that protects the parents and blames the child.”

    That just sucks big time, EE. It reminds me of that poor little girl, Joan Bennett?, that many have said was a child temptress, Lolita type. I suspect she was just trying to get some sleep and some pervert had his way with her, the rest being smear and hype.

    BTW, did they ever solve that crime?

    Anyway, that Freud would pick on a defenseless group (children) like that to win some adult friends over to his way of thinking is just the pits.

  83. anywho, as dave says, i think life is pretty much plain vanilla with a bunch of syrup flavors and ground/chopped nuts on top to cover the all too obvious fact that life is just plain vanilla.

    dreams of chocolate, strawberry and pistachio are just that, dreams.

  84. sorry for the ranting, it must be this new coffee.

    regarding john lennon and bed peace, vietnam was over and done by 1975-76. it was resolved on many fronts, like “four dead in Ohio” aka Kent State, the 1968 Democratic Party convention, Nixon and HK’s bombing of North Vietnam and Cambodia, and the not small fact that we lost the guerrilla war in the South and had to exit there before being overrun by Viet Cong and North Vietnamese regulars.

    in the early 1980s, we were at war with no one in particular. I’m sure there were many that wanted to bomb Iran over the hostages, but there are always some wanting to bomb somebody, just because we can usually get away with it (no one reciprocates). hell, they’re still at it over Iran.

    so what were john and yoko in bed protesting? he was already past his prime as an artist and political activist. grandstanding with yoko made the news, but by the time of his death it was over by about 10 years for him as an artist and he was resting on his laurels and raking in the dough so he could invest in dairy farms, etc. yoko was/is the pits. i sincerely hope she was a good fuck for john, as she was nothing much else, especially to look at.

    just my take on things.

  85. shill-someone who invents a disingenous story designed to affect the beliefs a target audience in a ceratin manner, and gets paid for it. there are many ways to get paid, it doesn’t have to be money. we’re just used to thinking in those terms. if the shill believes his own story, so much the better. i’d say.

  86. dreams of chocolate, strawberry and pistachio are just that, dreams.

    yeah, but they do come true for celebrities in general, thus thier power over the rank and file. as in, “fuck, i wish somea that shit would rub off on me.”

  87. 1969

    yeah, one(there are more) of the reasons that i turn away from politics in general is the feeling that as soon as one appeals to a political leader of sorts for anything, one does nothing but legitmize that person’s role as an arbitrator of the existing order. not that i have a particular problem with the existing order. it’s about as good as any other i’m aware of, i guess. i just don’t like the idea of legitimizing someone higher on the pecking order than i am, personal issues.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bed-In

  88. http://www.johnlennonbedin.com/How-I-Got-In.html

    So there I was, sitting in the room with John Lennon, Roger Scott, Charles P. Rodney Chandler and Yoko Ono. Roger was on the air interviewing John and I was seated in a corner of the room not more than 10 feet away, shooting images. After about 10 minutes of interviewing John, Roger had Charles P. Rodney Chandler play one of John’s songs. During the break I couldn’t resist the temptation to go over and sit next to John and ask him a question. “John tell me what the meaning was behind Strawberry Fields Forever” I asked. “Well Roy, I will tell you. It was like this. We had 11 songs for the album and we needed one more song, so we wrote Strawberry Fields.” “You mean, there was no deep psychedelic message about love, peace, eternity and all that?” I asked. “No nothing like that, it was just a song, Roy, just one of many songs. Other people gave them special meaning, depth and intent, we just wrote songs. The record company just kept telling us to put out more records and write more songs. We were just a bloody machine.”

  89. “Living is easy with eyes closed, misunderstanding all you see.
    It’s getting hard to be someone but it all works out.
    It doesn’t matter much to me. [sounds like dave]

    Let me take you down, ’cause I’m going to Strawberry Fields.
    Nothing is real and nothing to get hung about.
    Strawberry Fields forever. [moron dave]

    Always know sometimes think it’s me, but you know I know and it’s a dream.
    I think I know of thee, ah yes, but it’s all wrong.
    That is I think I disagree.” [pure Bunn Bunn]

  90. The 60′s were so overrated.

    yeah, so were the 30’s, 40’s, 50’s, 70’s, 80’s, 90’s and 00’s. the 2010″s are turing out just right though.

  91. yeah, i’ve always thought that the greatest generation[sic] was just a bunch of corporate dick suckers. the plague generation of 1340’s europe was the greatest generation ever. i could be wrong, but i think that there was some kind og mini ice age around that same time. those fuckers knew how to die with pizzazz. god how i miss plauge carrying rats in my meager pile of wheat, and the monks the i had to pay off in order to keep enough for my self and my hag of a wife and crappy starving kids.

  92. “Living is easy with eyes closed, misunderstanding all you see.
    It’s getting hard to be someone but it all works out.
    It doesn’t matter much to me. [sounds like dave]

    Let me take you down, ’cause I’m going to Strawberry Fields.
    Nothing is real and nothing to get hung about.
    Strawberry Fields forever. [moron dave]

    yeah, i drop acid every morning before i post here. how did you know that? lennon’s a fucking liar, this song is all about dropping acid and shit.

  93. actually, from the first time that read candide, i was a fan of dr. pangloss. my catch phrase, however, would probably be something like: “yes, that’s exactly what you should do. something will happen.”

  94. it’ll be great when monkeys use bicycles to mine coal. personally, i’m figuring on cornering the east coast market on mules. then we’ll see whose trippin’ on what, and shit.

  95. i wonder if “Hal Jalapeno” is his real name…

    you know, it’s really moron dead around here without our two or three other regular posters, JR, Bunn Bunn and MOU? MOU has been MIA or AWOL for some time now. it’s probably your fault, dave.

  96. i’m pretty busy myself these daz. right now i’m counting chilean miners being rescued over on cnn.

  97. it’s probably your fault, dave.

    yeah, it’s all my fault. but yeah, it is pretty lame with only 3 or 4 people posting. my problem is that every other place i go, i end up getting moderated into oblivion. but i maintain my standards no matter the outcome. so fuck it, dat’s what i say. if i see that i’m talking only to myself for a couple of days, i’ll just stick to using the internet for wacking off to porn and receiving email, not that that’s a bad thing.

  98. Everybody is probably busy looking to see if their loan documents got lost in the MERS two-step.

    I have even seen this being called the banking industry’s Stalingrad. Points for dramatic effect no doubt, and if true, couldn’t happen to a nicer group of pricks.

    I have seen this discussed as being a rule of law issue, with which I mostly agree. Irrespective of the fact that some, perhaps even a majority, of the mortgagors are in arrears (dave alert), possibly even scum of the earth and perhaps not even worthy of contempt, the law is the law ( I am not an attorney, nor do I play one on teevee) and you gotta have the paperwork right, otherwise, all hell will break loose.

    “Every step of the process is designed to protect the property rights of all parties. The result is more than a mere transaction selling property from one party to another; rather, this has created a system where ownership interests are clearly defined; where title history can be reviewed going back decades and centuries. There is a certainty to the purchasers of this property against all future claims.

    Everything about this process has been created to make sure the transfer goes off perfectly. In a nation of laws, contract and property rights, there is no room for errors. Indeed, even small technical flaws can be repaired via a process called “perfecting title.”

    As we noted previously, esteemed economists such as Hernando de Soto have identified that the respect for title, proper documentation, contract law and private property rights are the underlying reason capitalism works in Western nations, but seems to flounder elsewhere.

    We cannot have free market capitalism without this process. So what does it mean if banks have been systemically, fraudulently and illegally undermining this process?”

    http://www.ritholtz.com/blog/2010/10/why-foreclosure-fraud-is-so-dangerous-to-property-rights/

    On the other hand, maybe somebody read Orlov’s work and this is a last ditch desperate attempt to create a majority of government owned housing.

  99. While supplies last – a free Super Soaker(TM) with every JTEC!

    “Where a steam engine uses the heat generated by burning coal to create steam pressure and move mechanical elements, the JTEC uses heat (from the sun, for instance) to expand hydrogen atoms in one stack. The expanding atoms, each made up of a proton and an electron, split apart, and the freed electrons travel through an external circuit as electric current, charging a battery or performing some other useful work. Meanwhile the positively charged protons, also known as ions, squeeze through a specially designed proton-exchange membrane (one of the JTEC elements borrowed from fuel cells) and combine with the electrons on the other side, reconstituting the hydrogen, which is compressed and pumped back into the hot stack. As long as heat is supplied, the cycle continues indefinitely. ”

    http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2010/11/shooting-for-the-sun/8268

  100. UR, you would not believe the conversation that was held in my office this morning, so I will just tell you that an inventor who may be a savant (or not) was explaining his ideas (after we signed the appropos NDA forms) on contained nuclear fusion. He wants to build one here on campus, in the Art Dept. I told him the most appropriate place to build those things is under the football bleachers.

  101. Bubba savant?

    Dunno Doom, I just don’t get that warm and fuzzy feeling with nucaler power generation – as we know it. It just comes across as so Rube Goldberg. Although, it (nuclear power generation) appears to be one of the few things the French got right, mechanically speaking. Ok, that and the Citroën.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: