Peak Sand

06.05.2017

Peak Sand

A report published in 2004 by the American Geological Institute said that a typical American house requires more than a hundred tons of sand, gravel, and crushed stone for the foundation, basement, garage, and driveway, and more than two hundred tons if you include its share of the street that runs in front of it. A mile-long section of a single lane of an American interstate highway requires thirty-eight thousand tons. The most dramatic global increase in aggregate consumption is occurring in parts of the world where people who build roads are trying to keep pace with people who buy cars. Chinese officials have said that by 2030 they hope to have completed a hundred and sixty-five thousand miles of roads—a national network nearly three and a half times as long as the American interstate system.

 

 

Gimme Shelter
Clusterfuck Nation
by James Howard Kunstler
June 5, 2017

To me, the Paris Accords were just another feel-good PR stunt enabling politicians to pretend that they could control forces that are already way out-of-hand, an international vanity project of ass-covering. The coming economic collapse will depress global industrial activity whether anybody likes it or not, and despite anyone’s pretense of good intentions — and then we will have a range of much more practical problems of everyday life to contend with.

 

The Dangers of Indulging Reckless Clients
By DANIEL LARISON • June 5, 2017

 

F. Scott Fitzgerald’s American Identity
David Brown explains his meteoric rise to fame
By PAUL GOTTFRIED • June 4, 2017

 

David Lynch’s “Twin Peaks” returns—to its white fantasia

Ali is the title character of Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Ali: Fear Eats The Soul (1974), a film that is, among other things, a scornful survey of racial stratification in 1970s Germany. It centers on the romantic relationship between Ali (El Hedi ben Salem), a black Moroccan immigrant in his late thirties, and Emmi (Brigitte Mira), a white German woman nearly twice his age. Through the prism of this relationship, Fassbinder implicates all of white German society in its harsh treatment and exploitation of men like Ali.

Though Fassbinder’s Ali is a masterpiece, it’s an imperfect one. It eventually suffers from some of the ills it critiques. Several times we see Ali stark naked; in fact, he’s one of only two characters in the film to strip down. He bears the brunt of sexuality onscreen, and the objectification of his body doesn’t stop with the people who hurl abuse at him. Fassbinder, too, objectifies Ali—by fetishizing him. How many times do we see Ali’s penis?

 

Every Hollywood Movie This Year Sucks

 

Tainted buffet at Jacksonville strip club blamed after severe diarrhea incident on stage

While the results of the lab analysis are yet to come back, one source familiar with the investigation told reporters that bad shrimp was the most likely cause of the diarrhea. “Typically shrimp are involved in cases like this, particularly when they are not cleaned thoroughly.”

 

There’s one key reason the Fed has been too optimistic for more than a decade

“The Fed has now overestimated the strength of the US economy for 11 consecutive years,” DeLong writes. “Elementary mathematics dictates that credible forecasts should at least overestimate half the time and undershoot half the time. If each year of Fed forecasting were a coin toss, we would now have had eleven heads in a row, and zero tails. The odds of that happening are one in 2,048.”

There’s a key reason for the Fed’s undue optimism: It is not only the economy’s steward, but has also taken on the uncomfortable and dangerous role of cheerleader. This may help maintain confidence in the short-run, but is costly to the central bank’s credibility in the long run.

 

This entry was posted by JR.

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